Voice Therapy

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Voice Therapy

You may have noticed that your voice sounds different, or you may have already been to an ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat doctor) who suggested you seek out speech therapy.  If you haven’t already been to an ENT, it is important to do so before starting therapy.  The ENT will perform a stroboscopy to view your vocal cords.  You may have also seen a neurologist, depending on your other symptoms.

Some common voice disorders are muscle tension dysphonia, vocal nodules, PVFM, unilateral vocal cord paralysis and spasmodic dysphonia to name a few.  Some voice disorders are common with certain diseases such as the soft, tremulous voice that declines over time in Parkinson’s Disease.  Some voice disorders are due to functional overuse like nodules, where small callous like bumps appear on your vocal cords.  Inefficient breathing and overuse of the muscles in and around your larynx can cause muscle tension dysphonia.  Some voice disorders worsen with the presence of reflux or allergies.    

Most voice disorders are highly treatable.  Depending on your diagnosis, a specific treatment may be used to improve your voice and your health.  A full evaluation will include a look at your medical history, environment and habits that may contribute to a voice disorder, and an examination will include a number of voice measurements and clinical impressions about your voice quality, volume, pitch, and intonation, resonance and effect on your speech.  This includes your breathing and posture.